KO 대한민국
베어링 인베스트먼트 인스티튜트
거시경제 및 지정학

What Do We Really Want From China? And What Can We Reasonably Expect?

2019년10월4일 - 3 분 읽기

Even an unexpected trade deal this week between the U.S. and China will not alter the trajectory of two alternate political, economic and social models coming to terms with each other as a fresh decade dawns.

Barring yet another jarring twist of fate, this week’s headlines will take stock of U.S.-China trade relations following another visit to Washington by a senior Chinese delegation. Investors will focus on anything in the tone from either side that might recalibrate the odds of tariffs on $160 billion of mainly consumer imports on December 15.

Markets may rise and fall, but the impact will always be brief. Even an unexpected deal will not alter the trajectory of two alternate political, economic and social models coming to terms with each other as a fresh decade dawns. A talented workforce comprising one in five humans who benefit from massive government subsidies, a favorable exchange rate and thoughtful central planning will naturally reshape traditional economic patterns.

Setting aside deep differences over democracy, citizens’ rights and the South China Sea, investors need to look past current headlines to understand what the world’s market economies should want from China to ensure global growth that is as strong and sustainable as possible.

The Current Asks

The Trump Administration’s tough talk and quick deployment of tariffs clearly got Beijing’s attention, but so far there’s little to show in changed behavior. Leaving aside a critique of the Administration’s tactics, part of the problem may be that its demands have been both too small and too big at the same time.

The focus on Chinese commitments to buy U.S. agricultural exports seems barely a temporary solution to help redress a bilateral goods deficit. Meanwhile, the currency complaints are long out-of-date, with recent interventions actually intended to slow the weakening renminbi.

At the same time, Washington has pressed to end coordinated government support for Chinese firms, including its Made in China 2025 program that is intended to support global leadership in areas from artificial intelligence to aeronautics to biomedicines. These require fundamental changes in China’s political structure and hardly seem likely.

“Setting aside deep differences over democracy, citizens’ rights and the South China Sea, investors need to look past current headlines to understand what the world’s market economies should want from China to ensure global growth that is as strong and sustainable as possible.”

Realistic Expectations

So if investors want a global economy where growth is more stable, balanced and sustainable, what should be our top asks?

First, of course, would be a more level playing field to tap into growing Chinese markets. Beijing has been demonstratively pressing ahead with plans to broaden access to its financial markets in spite of recent trade friction. It has even cut tariffs to some trading partners to offset the added costs of tariffs on U.S. products. Nevertheless, it’s hard to describe Chinese markets as “open” and the capital account remains mostly closed.

Of greater concern may be China’s active efforts at import substitution in manufacturing. Even if officials play down “Made in China 2025,” the efforts to advance these key sectors continue. China’s current import of manufactured goods, as economist Brad Setser has argued, suggests a troubling pattern of what he calls “deglobalization.”

GROSS SAVING AS A % OF GDPGROSS SAVING AS A % OF GDPSource: Bloomberg as of OCTOBER 4, 2019

Second, China’s national savings rate of 46% of GDP is more than twice the global average and introduces real growth risks that transcend its borders. The combination of an ageing population and legacy of a one-child policy has led households to sock away as much money as possible for retirement. Historically, such distortions have contributed to a large current account surplus that has undercut global demand. Consider for a moment that China’s GDP per capita ranks near Brazil, but its consumption per capita is closer to Nigeria.

More recently, external accounts have returned closer to balance, but the excess savings have fueled an unsustainable investment boom. A more reliable Chinese social safety net that allows increased household consumption would do more for global growth than any trade understanding.

Third on most wish lists must be a more transparent and sustainable financial system. The government recognized these risks when it reined in informal credit growth last year, but the IMF continues to urge progress on boosting bank capital, improving regulation and ending implicit guarantees for state-owned enterprises.

The risks of the Chinese financial system are no longer restricted to China alone. Not only is a healthy Chinese economy crucial to sustainable global growth, but its outward financial flows are increasingly important. It’s tempting to say that the next global financial crisis could start in China unless reforms bring more transparency and stability.

None of these changes will be easy or quick, but progress toward any of them would be far more consequential than the issues the trade teams will discuss this week. For now, Beijing and Washington seem locked in a relationship that includes tariffs. Investors will need to look beyond these escalating exchanges for signs of durable Chinese reforms that may deliver stronger and more sustainable global growth.

해당 자료에 제시된 전망은 작성 시 시장에 대한 베어링자산운용의 견해를 바탕으로 작성되었습니다. 작성된 이후, 다양한 요인에 따라 사전통지 없이 내용이 변경될 수 있습니다. 또한 본 자료에서 언급된 투자 결과, 포트폴리오 구성 및 사례는 단순 참고용이며, 결코 미래 투자 성과 혹은 미래 포트폴리오 구성을 보장하지 않습니다. 투자에는 위험이 수반됩니다. 투자와 투자에서 발생하는 향후 소득 가치는 하락 또는 상승할 수 있으며, 투자 수익은 보장되지 않습니다. 과거성과는 현재 또는 미래성과를 보장하지 않습니다. 

더 읽어보기

또한 본 자료에서 언급된 투자 결과, 포트폴리오 구성 및 사례는 단순 참고용이며, 결코 미래 투자 성과 혹은 미래 포트폴리오 구성을 보장하지 않습니다. 실제 투자의 구성, 규모 및 위험은 본 자료에서 제시된 사례와 현저히 다를 수 있으며, 투자의 향후 수익 혹은 손실 여부에 대해 보증 및 보장하지 않습니다. 환율 변동은 투자가치에 영향을 미칠 수 있습니다. 잠재 투자자들은 본 자료에 언급된 펀드의 자세한 내용과 구체적인 위험요인에 관하여 투자설명서를 반드시 읽어 보시기 바랍니다.
베어링은 전 세계 베어링 계열사의 자산운용 및 관련 사업의 상표명입니다. Barings LLC, Barings Securities LLC, Barings (U.K.) Limited, Barings Global Advisers Limited, Barings Australia Pty Ltd, Barings Japan Limited, Barings Real Estate Advisers Europe Finance LLP, BREAE AIFM LLP, Baring Asset Management Limited, Baring International Investment Limited, Baring Fund Managers Limited, Baring International Fund Managers (Ireland) Limited, Baring Asset Management (Asia) Limited, Baring SICE (Taiwan) Limited, Baring Asset Management Switzerland Sarl, Baring Asset Management Korea Limited 등은 Barings LLC의 금융서비스 계열사로(단독으로는 “계열사”) “베어링”으로 통칭합니다.
본 자료는 정보 제공의 목적으로 작성된 것이며, 특정 상품이나 서비스의 매매를 제안하거나 권유하기 위한 것이 아닙니다. 본 자료의 내용은 독자의 투자목적, 재무상태 또는 구체적인 니즈를 고려하지 않고 작성되었습니다. 따라서, 본 자료는 투자자문, 권유, 리서치 또는 특정 증권, 상품, 투자, 투자전략 등의 적합성 또는 적절성에 대한 권고가 아니며 그러한 행위로 인식되어서도 안됩니다. 본 자료는 투자 전망 또는 예측으로 해석되어서는 안됩니다.
달리 명시되지 않는 한, 본 자료에 제시된 견해는 베어링의 것입니다. 작성 당시 알려진 사실을 바탕으로 신의 성실하게 작성 되었으며 사전통지 없이 변경될 수 있습니다. 개별 포트폴리오 운용팀은 본 자료에 제시된 것과 다른 견해를 가질 수 있으며 고객별로 다른 투자 결정을 내릴 수 있습니다. 본 자료의 일부 내용은 베어링이 신뢰할 만 하다고 판단하는 출처에서 획득한 정보를 근거로 작성되었습니다. 본 자료에 수록된 정보의 정확성을 확보하기 위해 최선의 노력을 기울였으나, 베어링은 정보의 정확성, 완전성 및 적절성을 명시적 또는 묵시적으로 보증하거나 보장하지 않습니다.
본 자료에 언급된 서비스, 증권, 투자 또는 상품은 잠재투자자에게 적합하지 않을 수 있으며 해당 관할권에서 제공되지 않을 수 있습니다. 본 자료의 저작권은 베어링에 있습니다. 본 자료에 제시된 정보는 개인용도로 사용될 수 있으나 베어링의 동의 없이 변형, 복제 또는 배포할 수 없습니다.

19-972587

X

베어링자산운용은 당사 웹사이트 사용자들에게 최적화된 웹 경험을 제공하고자 쿠키를 사용합니다.
베어링 웹사이트를 이용함으로써, 당사의 쿠키정책법적 & 개인정보고지사항에 동의하는 것으로 간주합니다.